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Clint Lacy Presents: Blood in the Ozarks
September 22nd 2017 by Dee Loflin
Clint Lacy Presents: Blood in the Ozarks
Bloomfield, Missouri - Deep in the eastern Ozarks of Missouri, a battle still rages about a massacre that happened on Christmas Day of 1863. While some call it a simple rescue mission to liberate captured Union soldiers, others claim that it was mass murder, which included women, children and the elderly.

The Civil War (or the War of the Rebellion as many Southerners prefer to call it), was a bitter and brutal conflict, but perhaps never more so than in the state of Missouri, where the wounds of the Kansas border wars were still open and festering.

Clint Lacy will present "Blood in the Ozarks" at the Stars & Stripes Museum on Monday, September 25th at 6:30 p.m. at the Stoddard County Historical Society meeting.

"Blood in the Ozarks: Union War Crimes against Southern Sympathizers & Civilians in Civil War Missouri

Layout 1By Clint Lacy. Deep in the eastern Ozarks of Missouri, a battle still rages about a massacre that happened on Christmas Day of 1863. While some call it a simple rescue mission to liberate captured Union soldiers, others claim that it was mass murder, which included women, children and the elderly.

The Civil War (or the War of the Rebellion as many Southerners prefer to call it), was a bitter and brutal conflict, but perhaps never more so than in the state of Missouri, where the wounds of the Kansas border wars were still open and festering.

Though no famous battles were fought in Missouri, there was severe fighting across the state. In fact, Missouri ranks third in the number of battles and skirmishes during the war. Most of the 1,162 military encounters that took place in the Show Me State were smaller and much more personal than in the Eastern Theater of the war.

The brutality of the conflict was punctuated with multiple Union war crimes, especially in the eastern Ozarks. There, Southern patriots like Joe Shelby, Timothy Reeves and others raised regiments and did the best they could to halt the advance of the better-armed and better-supplied Union juggernaut, conducting lightning raids and surprise attacks—and even beating the Union in pitched battles.

But rather than take their frustrations out upon the rebel forces, Union commanders in the area—Maj. James Wilson, Capt. William Leeper and others—preferred instead to target the civilians of the Ozarks as a way to subjugate the Southern sympathizers of the region. As a result of this policy, 27,000 Missouri citizens were killed during the war.

Starvation, theft, looting, torching homes and outright murder were not uncommon tactics used by this bevy of Federal miscreants whose criminal tactics culminated on Christmas Day 1863 at Tom Pulliam’s farm in Ripley County. It was there, on one of the holiest of Christian holidays, a day universally regarded as a day to avoid bloodshed between even the most bitter of enemies, that the Confederates and their families were set upon by a group of Union cavalry under the command of the aforementioned Maj. Wilson.

According to eyewitnesses and numerous other sources, 34 of the attendees were killed and 100 more wounded by the berserk Union Missouri State Militia Cavalry.

To this day, local historians with an axe to grind have worked diligently to cover up this heinous war crime—perhaps the worst of the Civil War—to protect local reputations. Historian Jerry Ponder, who was the first modern historian to expose this Christmas Day massacre—was relentlessly defamed for his pioneering reports on the tragedy. But, despite the recriminations, Ponder never backed off his research or his story.

Sadly, Ponder passed away in 2005, but author Clint Lacy has taken up Ponder’s torch of truth and, in this book, Lacy presents all the known evidence, making a strong case that the Wilson Massacre, as it has come to be known, did in fact occur as Ponder claimed, despite the denials of those looking to sweep it under the rug.

But the Wilson Massacre was not the only Union war crime in Missouri. Lacy also discusses many others committed by Union forces in Missouri in his attempt to bring history into accord with the facts and shine the light of truth on one of the darkest periods of American history.

Softcover, foreword by TBR Editorial Board member Prof. Ray Goodwin, six appendices based upon period newspaper reports and diary entries, informative photo section, 157 pages."

Last Updated on September 22nd 2017 by Dee Loflin




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A Salute to the Colors - Veterans Invited to Attend
September 21st 2017 by Dee Loflin
A Salute to the Colors - Veterans Invited to Attend

Dexter, Missouri - On Friday, September 22, 2017 at the pre-game of the Dexter Homecoming Football game Veterans are invited to "A Salute to the Colors" and will be honored to hold the large American Flag on the football field during pre-game.

The Dexter High School Marching band will play America the Beautiful and the National Anthem while a large American Flag is unfolded on the field.  Veterans can wear their uniforms, covers, or caps and will be invited to appear on the field.

Veterans please be at the Field House at 6:20 p.m. to participate.  If you go to the Pass Gate you will get in Free to the football game.

Kick-off is 7:00 p.m. against the Caruthersville Tigers with Homecoming coronation at 6:30 p.m.  Don't forget the Tailgate Festivities at 4:30 p.m.



Last Updated on September 21st 2017 by Dee Loflin




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Brown Farm of Stoddard County Receives MO Century Farm Designation
September 20th 2017 by Dee Loflin
Brown Farm of Stoddard County Receives MO Century Farm Designation
Bloomfield, Missouri -  University of Missouri, Stoddard County Extension Council awards the Brown family the Missouri Century Farm designation.

The Missouri Century Farm is awarded to those families who have continuously owned a Missouri farm for 100 years.

The award is in cooperation with University of Missouri and Missouri Farm Bureau.
 
Pictured are the Brown Family Farm Designation: from left to right - Gaylon Bryeans, Glennon Bryeans, Harold Bryeans - farm caretakers; Mary Marcella Brown, Joseph E. Brown, Katie Brown Beseda, Douglas Brown and Scott Beseda - Brown family;  Anthony Bochold, Chair, Stoddard County Extension Council and Van Ayers, University of Missouri Extension, Stoddard County. Presentation at the Stoddard County Extension Office, Bloomfield, MO.



Last Updated on September 20th 2017 by Dee Loflin




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Shilts Farm of Stoddard County Receives MO Century Farm Designation
September 20th 2017 by Dee Loflin
Shilts Farm of Stoddard County Receives MO Century Farm Designation
Bloomfield, Missouri - University of Missouri, Stoddard County Extension Council awards the Shilts family the Missouri Century Farm designation.

The Missouri Century Farm is awarded to those families who have continuously owned a Missouri farm for 100 years.

The award is in cooperation with University of Missouri and Missouri Farm Bureau.

Pictured are Norma Heist and Karen Simon (daughter) with the Shilts Farm designation.


Last Updated on September 20th 2017 by Dee Loflin




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Local Residents Chosen as State Fair Farm Family for Stoddard County
September 20th 2017 by Dee Loflin
Local Residents Chosen as State Fair Farm Family for Stoddard County
Bloomfield, Missouri -  Jerald and Ginger Sifford and grandchildren of Dudley, Missouri, were among the families honored during the 59th annual Missouri Farm Family Day, at the Missouri State Fair.

The Sifford family was selected as the Stoddard County Missouri Farm Family by the Stoddard County Extension Council and local Farm Bureau.
 
Each year, the fair sets aside a day to recognize farm families from across the state who are active in their communities, involved in agriculture, and/or participate in local outreach and extension programs such as 4-H or FFA.

The annual event is sponsored by five partner agencies: the Missouri Farm Bureau, the Missouri Department of Agriculture, the Missouri State Fair and Commissioners, the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, and University of Missouri Extension.

One hundred twelve of Missouri’s 114 counties were represented this year, with two counties still dealing with the aftermath of the recent flooding in southern Missouri.

The event showcases the impact Missouri Farm Families have on the economy and heritage of the state. “These families are involved in agriculture activities in their communities, and are active participants in local outreach and extension,” said Missouri State Fair Director Mark Wolfe. “As the showcase for Missouri agriculture, the Missouri State Fair is most certainly the appropriate place to celebrate these families.”


Last Updated on September 20th 2017 by Dee Loflin




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